Acute vs. Chronic health care

Difference Between Acute And Chronic health care

In all the talk about Doctor Dust and unpleasant health stories, I think it is important to emphasize the difference between acute and chronic treatment in the health care system.

In the case of acute injuries, the Norwegian health care system is amazingly good. If I were to choose any country in the world to have a traffic accident, it will be Norway. With highly qualified staff in the emergency ambulance, technological expertise and excellence trauma hospitals and operating rooms, you can be assured that if the worst happens, you are in good hands.

I have had serious accidents both at home and abroad and has much praise for acute help I have received in Norway. So, if you survive an acute accident, being treated in hospital and are completely healthy after a few months, you’ve probably experienced the best of Norwegian health care system.

If your symptoms do not go over in 3-4 months, you must end up in a different health system. Then the option is the primary care and family doctor who takes over. GPs often have 4 weeks of waiting for a 15-minute conversation. Then it is to be effective, thorough and clear-headed when you get to talk with her. The doctor may possibly refer you to various specialists, if it is seen as appropriate based on your symptoms, or treatment consists mostly of physical therapy, medication and short conversations with a doctor who often cannot do very much except to write out prescriptions and referrals.

During the treatment you receive in the earlier months after the injury, it is likely that you have to fight very hard to access later. Anyone can get into the crown technician trap. The fact is that the treatment goes on for a time and is very inefficient when it has been a few months.

If the doctor’s first two or three treatment trials have not worked, you should not give up and just resort to prescription block. You should be continued looking for correct answers and the right treatment for you to become as healthy as possible. Exceptions exist, and they deserve a standing ovation, but the truth is often that it is much unmotivated to meet the same patient with the same problem time after time, without having any good treatment. Both doctor and patient give up, and the patient may begin an extended exploration of alternative treatment options with varying results. The quality of life, work and capacity may not return.

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