Arctic Fox Vs. Red Fox

Difference Between Arctic Fox And Red Fox

 

Arctic Fox

Arctic foxes are the only members of the dog family that change color. They do this twice a year—once for summer and once for winter. There are two subspecies of Arctic foxes: white foxes and blue foxes. In summer, they look alike, with coats of gray-brown fur. But in winter the white fox has a white coat. The blue fox has a light-gray or brown coat with a bluish tinge. White foxes typically spend the winter in snowy places. Their white coat blends into the snow. Blue foxes usually spend the winter near seacoasts. The weather is milder there.

The Arctic fox has another important adaptation to help it survive in the far north. The animal’s very small ears are heavily covered with fur. Small ears lose much less body heat than large ears do.

Arctic foxes feed mainly on small rodents called lemmings. They also eat birds, bird eggs, insects, and berries. Sometimes their usual prey is in short supply. These creatures will then follow polar bears and eat the remnants of their prey. But the foxes must not get too close to the bears. Polar bears eat Arctic foxes if they can catch them. The main enemies of Arctic foxes are humans. People kill the foxes for their thick and lustrous fur.

Red Fox

The red fox lives in many places. These include Eurasia, North Africa, North America, and Central America. They can even be found in Australia. It has adapted to all habitats. These range from dense forests to tundra. They are also found in altitudes up to 15,000 feet.

An adult male fox establishes a territory. There he will live with his family. It is usually one or two females, or vixens, and their offspring. The family lives in a main burrow. There the female gives birth and raises her young. A clever fox digs several emergency holes. These are used for shelter in case of danger. These tunnels can be as long as 30 feet. They all lead to the living chamber.

Mating takes place in the winter. In the spring, the female gives birth. A litter can contain four to eight pups. After about ten days, the pups open their eyes. They are weaned at two months of age. The family stays together until the autumn. Then the young leave to establish a new territory. That is where they will spend their lives.

 

Arctic Fox

Arctic foxes are the only members of the dog family that change color. They do this twice a year—once for summer and once for winter. There are two subspecies of Arctic foxes: white foxes and blue foxes. In summer, they look alike, with coats of gray-brown fur. But in winter the white fox has a white coat. The blue fox has a light-gray or brown coat with a bluish tinge. White foxes typically spend the winter in snowy places. Their white coat blends into the snow. Blue foxes usually spend the winter near seacoasts. The weather is milder there.

The Arctic fox has another important adaptation to help it survive in the far north. The animal’s very small ears are heavily covered with fur. Small ears lose much less body heat than large ears do.

Arctic foxes feed mainly on small rodents called lemmings. They also eat birds, bird eggs, insects, and berries. Sometimes their usual prey is in short supply. These creatures will then follow polar bears and eat the remnants of their prey. But the foxes must not get too close to the bears. Polar bears eat Arctic foxes if they can catch them. The main enemies of Arctic foxes are humans. People kill the foxes for their thick and lustrous fur.

Red Fox

The red fox lives in many places. These include Eurasia, North Africa, North America, and Central America. They can even be found in Australia. It has adapted to all habitats. These range from dense forests to tundra. They are also found in altitudes up to 15,000 feet.

An adult male fox establishes a territory. There he will live with his family. It is usually one or two females, or vixens, and their offspring. The family lives in a main burrow. There the female gives birth and raises her young. A clever fox digs several emergency holes. These are used for shelter in case of danger. These tunnels can be as long as 30 feet. They all lead to the living chamber.

Mating takes place in the winter. In the spring, the female gives birth. A litter can contain four to eight pups. After about ten days, the pups open their eyes. They are weaned at two months of age. The family stays together until the autumn. Then the young leave to establish a new territory. That is where they will spend their lives.

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  • Greensoda3

    this is actually a great page to learn about animals and the video shows lots of pictures to help you imagine the animals

  • Greensoda3

    this is a bad page to because it also needs to show more information to understand the animals better 🙁