Chest Pain vs. Heart Pain

How to tell the difference between chest pain and heart pain

Many people believe that chest pain is always heart pain but this is not the case. A problem with the heart may not always present itself as a pain in the chest. The heart works 24 hours a day as the pump for the blood through the body and is located on the left hand side of the body. When the blood supply is not as much as it should be, chest pain on the left side can occur. In angina, a patient can experience pain after exertion and in a heart attack, also known as myocardial infarction, the pain is severe.

The lungs and the covering of the lungs (pleura) can also cause chest pain. One condition that causes pain is costocondritis, which is an inflammation of the rib cage. Pain associated with this condition as well as diseases of the pleura cause pain when breathing because of the movement of the ribs.

Chest pain can also result from problems in other organs of the body that are not located in the chest area. Gastritis can bring on pain in the chest. Acid reflux occurs when the acid in the stomach regurgitates into the esophagus, the tube that connects the throat to the stomach. This type of pain is often referred to as heartburn.

Heart pain is severe pain and the patient feels the tightening behind the center of the chest. It may radiate to the left arm and there is profuse sweating associated with it. However, it is possible that heart pain can be felt as a toothache.

Summary

  1. Chest pain and heart pain are felt in the chest.
  2. Heart pain is more severe than other types of chest pain.
  3. There is a lot of sweating associated with the pain of a heart attack (Myocardial infarction).
  4. It is possible that heart pain can be felt only in the left shoulder, upper left arm or as a toothache.
  5. Heart pain usually gets worse with exertion.
  6. Other conditions can cause chest pain, such as acid reflux and costocondritis.
  7. Heart pain is a sign of a serious condition and should be treated immediately.