Gecko vs. Anole

Difference Between Gecko And Anole

 

Gecko

Geckos are nocturnal, arboreal, generally stoutly built, insect-eating lizards found in warmer regions throughout the world. This diverse group is divided into about 75 genera and more than 400 species, constituting the family Gekhonidae. Most geckos are somber browns or grays, but some, such as the brilliant green day geckos, Phelsuma, are brightly colored. Geckos are commonly 10 to 15 cm (4 to 6 in) in total length, with a few reaching 30 cm (12 in)—for example, the tokay gecko, Gekko gecko, can grow to 35.5 cm (14 in). Some of the dwarf geckos, Sphaerodactylus, barely exceed 2.5 cm (1 in).

Geckos have large eyes, and most species do not have movable eyelids; in these, the eyes are covered with a protective, transparent scale. Except for the primitive types, which have rounded pupils, geckos have vertical-slit pupils, which may be straight-sided or lobed. The toes of geckos vary from simple clawbearing digits to those equipped with expanded pads and concealed claws.

Anole

Anole, an iguanid lizard of the genus Anolis, found in the Western Hemisphere. Anoles are sometimes called chameleons, because some species, but by no means all, have the ability to change color, generally from green to brown. The true chameleons of Africa and India belong to a different family (Chamaeleonidae).

Anoles, of which there are hundreds of species, inhabit southern Mexico, Central America, northern South America, and the West Indies. A. carolinensis is found over much of the southeastern United States. A. sagrei is common in the West Indies, but in the United States it exists only at the southern tip of Florida.

Anoles are specialized climbers, with dilated friction pads on the toes and fingers. They also are good swimmers. Males establish territories, advertising their ownership from some prominent point by expanding a brightly colored fan of skin beneath the throat to intimidate other males.

 

 

 

 

Gecko

Geckos are nocturnal, arboreal, generally stoutly built, insect-eating lizards found in warmer regions throughout the world. This diverse group is divided into about 75 genera and more than 400 species, constituting the family Gekhonidae. Most geckos are somber browns or grays, but some, such as the brilliant green day geckos, Phelsuma, are brightly colored. Geckos are commonly 10 to 15 cm (4 to 6 in) in total length, with a few reaching 30 cm (12 in)—for example, the tokay gecko, Gekko gecko, can grow to 35.5 cm (14 in). Some of the dwarf geckos, Sphaerodactylus, barely exceed 2.5 cm (1 in).

Geckos have large eyes, and most species do not have movable eyelids; in these, the eyes are covered with a protective, transparent scale. Except for the primitive types, which have rounded pupils, geckos have vertical-slit pupils, which may be straight-sided or lobed. The toes of geckos vary from simple clawbearing digits to those equipped with expanded pads and concealed claws.

Anole

Anole, an iguanid lizard of the genus Anolis, found in the Western Hemisphere. Anoles are sometimes called chameleons, because some species, but by no means all, have the ability to change color, generally from green to brown. The true chameleons of Africa and India belong to a different family (Chamaeleonidae).

Anoles, of which there are hundreds of species, inhabit southern Mexico, Central America, northern South America, and the West Indies. A. carolinensis is found over much of the southeastern United States. A. sagrei is common in the West Indies, but in the United States it exists only at the southern tip of Florida.

Anoles are specialized climbers, with dilated friction pads on the toes and fingers. They also are good swimmers. Males establish territories, advertising their ownership from some prominent point by expanding a brightly colored fan of skin beneath the throat to intimidate other males.

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