Coal Vs. Charcoal

Difference Between Cial and Charcoal Coal People have known since prehistoric times that coal is a rock that burns. Only within the past two centuries, however, has this material become a vital part of the world’s energy picture. Today, coal is one of the most widely used sources of power in the world, particularly as […]

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Voltaic Cells vs. Wet Cell

Difference Between Voltaic Cells And Wet Cell Voltaic Cells The flow of electrons, or electricity, in oxidation-reduction reactions presents an interesting possibility. What if the flow of electricity could be harnessed and used in a practical way? This is what happens whenever we use a car battery to power headlights, or a dry-cell battery to […]

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Spinal Cord vs. Meninges

Difference Between Spinal Cord And Meninges   The spinal cord is a long, somewhat cylindrical mass of nerve tissue lying in the spinal canal. Its average length is about 17.7 inches (45 centimeters) in men, and about 16.5 inches (42 centimeters) in women; however, the spinal cord makes up only about 2 percent of the […]

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Cerebrum vs. Cerebellum

Difference Between Cerebrum And Cerebellum The cerebrum is the largest part of the brain, accounting for four-fifths of its total weight. It is made up of two sections, or hemispheres. Moreover, each hemisphere has four parts, or lobes—the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes. The surface of the cerebrum consists of thin layers of nerve […]

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Pines vs. Spruces

Difference Between Pines And Spruces Pines are among the most common and widely distributed of all trees, with 100 species. Most grow naturally in the Northern Hemisphere, although they have now been introduced to all parts of the world. Pines are recognized by their bundled evergreen needles, which grow at the tips of short shoots. […]

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Pharynx vs. Larynx

Difference Between Pharynx And Larynx   After entering the nose or mouth, air passes freely through the pharynx, the tube that connects the mouth with the esophagus and the larynx. On its way to the larynx, air crosses above the entrance to the esophagus. Esophagus is the tube carrying food from mouth to stomach. To […]

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Humerus vs. Radius vs. Ulna

Difference Between Humerus And Radius And Ulna Humerus In the upper arm, there is but one bone, the humerus. Its knoblike upper end forms the ball portion of the ball-and-socket shoulder joint; the scapula forms the socket portion. The four muscles that immediately surround the shoulder joint are attached to the outer part of the […]

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Freezing vs. Freeze Drying

Difference Between Freezing And Freeze Drying Freezing. Freezing prevents spoilage by stopping the growth of microorganisms, which cannot function at very cold temperatures. Freezing dates back to the early 1900s, when the first commercial methods for freezing meat and fish were developed. But the process did not begin to compete with canning until after World […]

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Optical Microscopes vs. Electron Microscope

Difference Between Optical Microscopes And Electron Microscope Prior to 1930, all microscopes were “optical”: they produced images through the utilization of visible light—the form of electromagnetic radiation that the human eye can see. The first and most simple optical microscopes were hand lenses, also known as magnifying glasses. These generally consist of a single biconvex […]

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Nerve Fibers vs. Nerve Membranes

Difference Between Nerve Fibers And Nerve Membranes  Nerve fibers that transmit impulses from parts of the body to the brain or spinal cord are called afferent fibers (from the Latin affere, meaning “to carry to or in”), or sensory fibers. Fibers that transmit impulses from the brain or spinal cord to body structures are known […]

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