Spy Vs. Traitor

What Is The Difference Between  Spy And  Traitor?

There are a many good words in our language which change their mean in according as they are applied to a friend or an enemy

The word “spy” has an ugly sound about it. No mother would like her son to be a spy. It is what is called a term of opprobrium. It suggests some thing mean, underhand, furtive and treacherous. Decent people aim at being always honest, aboveboard, open and honest in all their dealings. The spy is just the opposite; and so we think of him with contempt. But that is because we apply the name to somebody who comes into our country and tries, for the sake of some other country, to worm his way into our secrets. When, on the other hand, someone goes into another country and, for our sake, worms his way into that country’s secrets, we don’t call him a spy: we call him a member of our secret service, or an officer of our intelligence department. We don’t despise indeed, we ought to hold him in honor; for his job is both difficult and dangerous ways; he takes his life in has hand. He needs keen intelligence and high courage. His failure may spell disaster for his country.

Our own spies are never called spies. We keep that ugly word for the other fellow secret services. Spy and a traitor belong to quite different categories. The spy serves, as best he can, his own country; the traitor betrays his own country. The spy uses the traitor, uses him while despising him. The traitor gives or sells to the spy the secrets of the country to which he has sworn allegiance. He is a traitor, whether his motive is love of the foreign country or love of money. There is all the difference in the world between a spy and a traitor. The spy may be, and often is, an honorable man.

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