Herpes Simplex I vs. Herpes Simplex II

Difference Between Herpes Simplex I And Herpes Simplex II

Herpes simplex I is a viral infection that causes blisters to form on the lips and inside the mouth. These blisters, also called cold sores, can develop into painful ulcers. Some people also have swollen gums and fever. The infection is usually mild in children and more severe in adults. Even after the infection is gone, the virus can remain. Another infection, such as a cold, or exposure to sun and wind often triggers another attack.

Mild cases require little treatment. This common infection usually presents no health risk. The major problem is transmission of the virus to the eye by touching it after contact with the cold sore. This can cause an ulcer to form on the eye.

Herpes simplex II is another infection caused by a herpes virus. People with this condition develop groups of blisters in the genital area. These blisters rupture and become small ulcers. Herpes simplex II is transmitted through sexual contact. About a week after contact with an infected person, pain, tenderness, and itching develop on the sexual organs. Blisters and sores soon appear and last from one to three weeks. Because the virus can remain in the body after the attack subsides, many people with herpes simplex II have repeated outbreaks of symptoms. Doctors may prescribe antiviral drugs to reduce the severity of symptoms and the frequency of outbreaks.

The risk of transmission of herpes simplex II is reduced, but not eliminated, if sexual contact is avoided until the blisters and sores clear up. Using condoms during sexual activity will also reduce the risk of transmitting the herpes infection.

 

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